Month: April 2019

Some Reasons Why Sugar Glider Prices Are Fairly Low for an Exotic Pet

Exotic pets are becoming more and more popular in the United States and around the world. Exotic pets are any creatures that can be kept domestically that are from somewhere else, have special needs, or are otherwise unusual. Boa constrictors kept as pets qualify, for instance.

So do tigers, for some of Hollywood’s rich and famous. But these are for the most part not everyone’s cup of tea–not a lot of people want an animal companion that isn’t safe to let out of its cage, as you can well imagine. It’s a frequent misconception, however, that this is all that it means for a pet to be ‘exotic’. Not all exotic pets are wild animals prone to dangerous behavior, and some of them fit in quite nicely with a human family. Those that know this the best are those that keep sugar gliders as pets.

Sugar gliders are tiny mammals roughly the size of rats or squirrels. However, they are not rodents: they are mammals. Sugar gliders are perhaps most similar to the flying squirrels seen in some of the United States’ wooded areas, but their habits and behavioral traits are quite a bit different.

It’s generally a good idea to look up a few sugar glider photos to get a proper grasp of how they look. They’re a little difficult to describe. Without a frame of reference in the form of a proper image, they might come off sounding like common rodents-which they are very, very far from. Gliders are adorable, with soulful eyes and clean, smooth coats of fur. Their wingflaps extend from their forepaws to their hindpaws, and allow them to glide. They’re also quite acrobatic!

What sets gliders apart from most pets-exotic or otherwise-is their loyalty. Sugar gliders bond with their owners in a powerful way. In the wild, gliders form colonies with other gliders, and they become inseparable for their decade-long lifespan. What this translates to in domesticity is a very loyal pet that won’t try to run away, and is far more comfortable in your shirt pocket than up a tree. Gliders … Read the rest

Airline Requirements When Traveling With Pets

Airlines, today, have implemented a number of requirements and safeguards for animals that will be traveling with them, most of which have been designed with the pet’s safety in mind. Unfortunately, it is not always easy for pet owners to know what these requirements are, as they do vary greatly from airline to airline.

A number of airlines, for instance, no longer allow pets to fly in their baggage compartments. However, some of these same airlines do allow pets in a plane’s cabin, as long as they are in appropriate carriers that can fit under the seat in front of them. Airlines also require that the pet remain in its carrier during the entire flight and have a reservation, as most limit the total number of animals that are allowed in a plane’s cabin on any given flight.

The exceptions are service animals, such as seeing eye dogs, which are allowed on a plane, regardless of how many other animals are already expected onboard. Additionally, a pet in its carrier is typically considered to be one of its owner’s carry-ons, so luggage plans should be made accordingly.

Even on airlines that do allow pets in the cabin, some destinations, including Hawaii and the United Kingdom, do not allow pets to be brought in as carry-ons. Also check with your airline if you have a pet other than a cat or a dog, as there are often restrictions on what types of animals may be allowed in an airplane’s cabin.

Of course, not all animals are small enough to qualify as carry-on baggage. Luckily for those pets, there are still some airlines, such as Delta and Alaska, which still accept pets and their carriers as check-in baggage. For safety reasons, many airlines require that the animal be at least eight weeks of age and that they fly in a non-collapsible carrier that is big enough to allow it to stand.

Some airlines, such as Continental, do not accept pets as checked luggage, but instead offers a cargo service that it feels is better suited for transporting pets.

Because airline … Read the rest